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virtualclutter:

Hair washing and care in the the 19th century
Hair washing is something that almost every historical writer, romance or not, gets wrong. How many times have you read a story in which a heroine sinks gratefully into a sudsy tub of water and scrubs her hair–or, even worse, piles it up on her head to wash it? Or have you watched the BBC’s Manor House and other “historical reenactment” series, in which modern people invariably destroy their hair by washing using historical recipes?

Historical women kept their hair clean, but that doesn’t mean their hair was often directly washed. Those who had incredibly difficult to manage hair might employ a hairdresser to help them wash, cut, and singe (yes, singe!) their hair as often as once a month, but for most women, hair-washing was, at most, a seasonal activity.
“Why?” you might ask. “Wasn’t their hair lank, smelly, and nasty?”
And the writers who embrace ignorance as a badge of honor will say, “Well, that just goes to show that people used to be gross and dirty, and that’s why I never bother with that historical accuracy stuff!”
And then I have to restrain myself from hitting them…
The reason that hair was rarely washed has to do with the nature of soaps versus modern shampoos. Soaps are made from a lye base and are alkaline. Hair and shampoo are acidic. Washing hair in soap makes it very dry, brittle, and tangly. Men’s hair was short enough and cut often enough that using soap didn’t harm it too much and the natural oils from the scalp could re-moisturize it fairly easily after even the harshest treatment, but in an age when the average woman’s hair was down to her waist, soap could literally destroy a woman’s head of hair in fairly short order.
Instead, indirect methods of hair-cleaning were used. Women washed their hair brushes daily, and the proverbial “100 strokes” were used to spread conditioning oils from roots to tips and to remove older or excess oil and dirt. This was more time-consuming than modern washing, and this is one of the reasons that “good hair” was a class marker. The fact that only women of the upper classes could afford all the various rats, rolls, and other fake additions to bulk out their real hair was another. (An average Victorian woman of the upper middle or upper class had more apparent “hair” in her hairstyle than women I know whose unbound hair falls well below their knees.) Women rarely wore their hair lose unless it was in the process of being put up or taken down–or unless they were having a picture specifically taken of it! At night, most women braided their hair for bed. Now that my hair is well below my waist, I understand why!
The first modern shampoo was introduced in the late 1920s. Shampoos clean hair quickly and also remove modern styling products, like hairspray and gel, but the frequent hair-washing that has become common leaves longer hair brittle even with the best modern formulations. (From the 1940s to the 1960s, many if not most middle-class women had their hair washed only once a week, at their hairdresser’s, where it was restyled for the next week. The professional hairdresser stepped into the void that the maid left when domestic service became rare. Washing one’s hair daily or every other day is a very recent development.) That’s where conditioners came into play. Many people have wondered how on earth women could have nice hair by modern standards before conditioners, but conditioners are made necessary by shampoos. Well-maintained hair of the 19th century didn’t need conditioners because the oils weren’t regularly stripped from it.
Additionally, the oils made hair much more manageable than most people’s is today, which made it possible for women to obtain elaborate hairstyles using combs and pins–without modern clips or sprays–to keep their hair in place. This is why hair dressers still like to work with “day-old” hair when making elaborate hairstyles.
There were hair products like oils for women to add shine and powders meant to help brush dirt out of hair, but they weren’t in very wide use at the time. Hair “tonics”–mean to be put on the hair or taken orally to make hair shinier, thicker, or stronger–were ineffective but were readily available and widely marketed.
If you have a heroine go through something particularly nasty–such as a fall into a pond or the like–then she should wash her hair, by all means. This would be done in a tub prepared for the purpose–not in the bath–and would involve dissolving soap shavings into a water and combine them with whatever other products were desired. Then a maid would wash the woman’s hair as she leaned either forward or backward to thoroughly wet and wash her hair. Rinsing would be another stage. The hair would NEVER be piled on the head. If you have greater than waist-length hair and have ever tried to wash it in a modern-sized bathtub, you understand why no one attempted to wash her hair in a hip bath or an old, short claw foot tub! It would be almost impossible.
A quick rundown of other hair facts:
Hydrogen peroxide was used to bleach hair from 1867. Before that, trying to bleach it with soda ash and sunlight was the most a girl could do. Henna was extremely popular from the 1870s through the 1890s, especially for covering gray hair, to such an extent that gray hair became almost unseen in certain circles in England in this time. Red hair was considered ugly up until the 1860s, when the public embracing of the feminine images as presented by the aesthetic movement (Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood) gained ground, culminating in a positive rage for red hair in the 1870s to 1880s. Some truly scary metallic salt compounds were used to color hair with henna formulations by the late 19th century, often with unfortunate results.
Hair curling was popular in the 19th century and could either by achieved with rag rolls or hot tongs. Loose “sausage” rolls were the result of rag rolling. Hot tongs were used for making the “frizzled” bangs of the 1870s to 1880s–and “frizzled” they certainly were. The damage caused by the poor control of heating a curler over a gas jet or candle flame was substantial, and most women suffered burnt hair at one time or another. For this reason, a number of women chose to eschew the popular style and preserve their hair from such dangers! Permanents were first in use in the 1930s.  
(From: http://www.lydiajoyce.com/blog/?p=1022)

virtualclutter:

Hair washing and care in the the 19th century

Hair washing is something that almost every historical writer, romance or not, gets wrong. How many times have you read a story in which a heroine sinks gratefully into a sudsy tub of water and scrubs her hair–or, even worse, piles it up on her head to wash it? Or have you watched the BBC’s Manor House and other “historical reenactment” series, in which modern people invariably destroy their hair by washing using historical recipes?

Historical women kept their hair clean, but that doesn’t mean their hair was often directly washed. Those who had incredibly difficult to manage hair might employ a hairdresser to help them wash, cut, and singe (yes, singe!) their hair as often as once a month, but for most women, hair-washing was, at most, a seasonal activity.

“Why?” you might ask. “Wasn’t their hair lank, smelly, and nasty?”

And the writers who embrace ignorance as a badge of honor will say, “Well, that just goes to show that people used to be gross and dirty, and that’s why I never bother with that historical accuracy stuff!”

And then I have to restrain myself from hitting them…

The reason that hair was rarely washed has to do with the nature of soaps versus modern shampoos. Soaps are made from a lye base and are alkaline. Hair and shampoo are acidic. Washing hair in soap makes it very dry, brittle, and tangly. Men’s hair was short enough and cut often enough that using soap didn’t harm it too much and the natural oils from the scalp could re-moisturize it fairly easily after even the harshest treatment, but in an age when the average woman’s hair was down to her waist, soap could literally destroy a woman’s head of hair in fairly short order.

Instead, indirect methods of hair-cleaning were used. Women washed their hair brushes daily, and the proverbial “100 strokes” were used to spread conditioning oils from roots to tips and to remove older or excess oil and dirt. This was more time-consuming than modern washing, and this is one of the reasons that “good hair” was a class marker. The fact that only women of the upper classes could afford all the various rats, rolls, and other fake additions to bulk out their real hair was another. (An average Victorian woman of the upper middle or upper class had more apparent “hair” in her hairstyle than women I know whose unbound hair falls well below their knees.) Women rarely wore their hair lose unless it was in the process of being put up or taken down–or unless they were having a picture specifically taken of it! At night, most women braided their hair for bed. Now that my hair is well below my waist, I understand why!

The first modern shampoo was introduced in the late 1920s. Shampoos clean hair quickly and also remove modern styling products, like hairspray and gel, but the frequent hair-washing that has become common leaves longer hair brittle even with the best modern formulations. (From the 1940s to the 1960s, many if not most middle-class women had their hair washed only once a week, at their hairdresser’s, where it was restyled for the next week. The professional hairdresser stepped into the void that the maid left when domestic service became rare. Washing one’s hair daily or every other day is a very recent development.) That’s where conditioners came into play. Many people have wondered how on earth women could have nice hair by modern standards before conditioners, but conditioners are made necessary by shampoos. Well-maintained hair of the 19th century didn’t need conditioners because the oils weren’t regularly stripped from it.

Additionally, the oils made hair much more manageable than most people’s is today, which made it possible for women to obtain elaborate hairstyles using combs and pins–without modern clips or sprays–to keep their hair in place. This is why hair dressers still like to work with “day-old” hair when making elaborate hairstyles.

There were hair products like oils for women to add shine and powders meant to help brush dirt out of hair, but they weren’t in very wide use at the time. Hair “tonics”–mean to be put on the hair or taken orally to make hair shinier, thicker, or stronger–were ineffective but were readily available and widely marketed.

If you have a heroine go through something particularly nasty–such as a fall into a pond or the like–then she should wash her hair, by all means. This would be done in a tub prepared for the purpose–not in the bath–and would involve dissolving soap shavings into a water and combine them with whatever other products were desired. Then a maid would wash the woman’s hair as she leaned either forward or backward to thoroughly wet and wash her hair. Rinsing would be another stage. The hair would NEVER be piled on the head. If you have greater than waist-length hair and have ever tried to wash it in a modern-sized bathtub, you understand why no one attempted to wash her hair in a hip bath or an old, short claw foot tub! It would be almost impossible.

A quick rundown of other hair facts:

Hydrogen peroxide was used to bleach hair from 1867. Before that, trying to bleach it with soda ash and sunlight was the most a girl could do. Henna was extremely popular from the 1870s through the 1890s, especially for covering gray hair, to such an extent that gray hair became almost unseen in certain circles in England in this time. Red hair was considered ugly up until the 1860s, when the public embracing of the feminine images as presented by the aesthetic movement (Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood) gained ground, culminating in a positive rage for red hair in the 1870s to 1880s. Some truly scary metallic salt compounds were used to color hair with henna formulations by the late 19th century, often with unfortunate results.

Hair curling was popular in the 19th century and could either by achieved with rag rolls or hot tongs. Loose “sausage” rolls were the result of rag rolling. Hot tongs were used for making the “frizzled” bangs of the 1870s to 1880s–and “frizzled” they certainly were. The damage caused by the poor control of heating a curler over a gas jet or candle flame was substantial, and most women suffered burnt hair at one time or another. For this reason, a number of women chose to eschew the popular style and preserve their hair from such dangers! Permanents were first in use in the 1930s.  

(From: http://www.lydiajoyce.com/blog/?p=1022)

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#ref 


medievalpoc:

brother-mouse reblogged your post how-much-farther-to-go asked:Do y… and added:

Jesus fucking christ, It’s a fantasy novel; key word FANTASY y’all need to calm the fuck down. I try to ignore this BS as much as I can but this post is pissing me off. Allow me to clarify; I have yet to read the books and I have never watched Game of Thrones. What l have seen are gifs and production stills of the show. It seems interesting and one day I shall read the books or watch the damn show. What I do know is that people need to stop pushing this whole “Oh my god everything is fucking racist because a PoC isn’t on the cover or the protagonist” seriously there are a million more important things in the world than some “vicious cycle of whiteness in publishing, authors, etc.” and even then so what if GRRM is misinformed about the mongols? He’s not a historian and one only needs to do some research of their own to find the truth. The Dothraki are a Proud Warrior Race that are inspired by the mongols. THEY ARE NOT MONGOLS. They are a FICTIONAL people in a FICTIONAL world. 

Hey, you know what’s funny here?

I’m an avid fan of the books AND the show. I have read every book, including the novellas, and watched every single episode of the show.

These books are fantasy, but I still live in the real world, where a friend of mine who is also a fan, a friend who has a college degree and is no youngster (and neither am I), told me point blank that the misogyny in GoT/ASOIAF is entirely due to “Things Were Just Like That Back Then”.

I live in the real world, where someone who hasn’t read the books OR seen the show thinks AUTOMATICALLY that I just need to shut up about it and stop complaining, despite having zero frame of reference for what I’m even criticizing.

This is exactly what N. K. Jemisin is talking about in the article “Confirmation Bias, Epic Fantasy, and You”. You haven’t read or seen it, but you have already decided that it is beyond criticism, or that fiction in general cannot be criticized. Quick, someone call Harvard and tell them They’re Doing It Wrong.

I live in the real world, where my race being horrifically misrepresented in a degrading and racist way in a work that I enjoy is something I am told to shut up about by someone who knows nothing, Jon Snow.

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shieldmaidenofsherwood:

darkarcherprince:

shieldmaidenofsherwood:

how to be seductive:

  • head tilt
  • hooded eyes
  • raised eyebrow
  • little smirk

how to be evil:

  • head tilt
  • hooded eyes
  • raised eyebrow
  • little smirk

do you see the problem

http://media.tumblr.com/efcb2bf88426110bd076a8d4e7deb536/tumblr_inline_mu7w38IYFl1qf1wgx.gif

This might win for favorite addition to my post.

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bombing:

turns out a creampie isn’t a pastry and the internet is a disgusting place

shared 6 hours ago, with 88,695 notes - via / source + reblog


appleprincess4444:

isitweirdthatim:

This will literally make your day

Is that who I think it is?

shared 6 hours ago, with 362,667 notes - via / source + reblog


queergear:

the-grand-fangirl:

cosplaytipsandtricks:

homestuckresources:

kcaacbay:

How to cover up tattoos!
use a red lipstick covering the outlines
pat on a light concealer, using a setting powder
pat on your skin tone concealer, and clean up any mistakes using baby wipes to remove excess concealer
use a fluffy brush and smooth it out with foundation powder.
VIDEO TUTORIAL:
http://youtu.be/-pYuvb3Iv4E

we don’t usually reblog/post cosplay stuff, but a friend pointed it out to me and i haven’t seen it elsewhere SO maybe it can help someone!

Useful for cosplay AND if you’re applying for a job that views tattoos as ‘unprofessional’. 

Also good for hickeys

This just seems useful for any purpose so here you go

queergear:

the-grand-fangirl:

cosplaytipsandtricks:

homestuckresources:

kcaacbay:

How to cover up tattoos!

  • use a red lipstick covering the outlines
  • pat on a light concealer, using a setting powder
  • pat on your skin tone concealer, and clean up any mistakes using baby wipes to remove excess concealer
  • use a fluffy brush and smooth it out with foundation powder.
VIDEO TUTORIAL:

we don’t usually reblog/post cosplay stuff, but a friend pointed it out to me and i haven’t seen it elsewhere SO maybe it can help someone!

Useful for cosplay AND if you’re applying for a job that views tattoos as ‘unprofessional’. 

Also good for hickeys

This just seems useful for any purpose so here you go

shared 6 hours ago, with 239,204 notes - via / source + reblog
#ref 


"ye"
— where did this come from and why can’t I stop saying it (via alphaidiot)
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niggawitdreadz:

toohot-tohoot:

niggawitdreadz:

How to spoon:

  • Dick hard on the butt
  • Titty in my hand
  • Kiss ya neck
  • Hell yeah
What

HOW TO SPOON

  • DICK HARD ON THE BUTT
  • TITTY IN MY HAND
  • KISS YA NECK
  • H E L L Y E A H
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utabay:


nazeem38:

exxpensiveslang:

shroomyloomyland:

That awkward moment when you moonwalk into MJ

I will reblog this forever.

Fun Fact: That kid is actually Alfonso Ribeiro, AKA Carlton from Fresh Prince.

THIS WOULD ONLY HAPPEN TO CARLTON 

utabay:

nazeem38:

exxpensiveslang:

shroomyloomyland:

That awkward moment when you moonwalk into MJ

I will reblog this forever.

Fun Fact: That kid is actually Alfonso Ribeiro, AKA Carlton from Fresh Prince.

THIS WOULD ONLY HAPPEN TO CARLTON 

shared 7 hours ago, with 662,924 notes - via / source + reblog
#my god 


halfboyfriend:

"are there any straight people in your story?”

"no they’re not relevant to the plot"

shared 16 hours ago, with 67,473 notes - via / source + reblog


monocleenterprises:

unbalancedfox:

g0ggles:

When people in movies run directly away from the train / boulder / truck / etc instead of just like, taking two steps to the side of it

OH NO A GIGANTIC TREE FALLING OVER *runs away directly along its length*

image

Bucky knows what’s up

shared 16 hours ago, with 113,177 notes - via / source + reblog


shared 17 hours ago, with 16,156 notes - via / source + reblog
#typ 


stripesandteeth:

Took a few photos of how my Eeveelution Buttons came out just incase anyone was curious! I just added them to my store as well so people could see. They look so much better in person though haha, so I’m pretty excited for those who have placed orders already to see for themselves! 

I still have a good amount available, you can buy them here!

shared 17 hours ago, with 762 notes - via / source + reblog


omnbvc:

true stories

shared 17 hours ago, with 13,787 notes - via / source + reblog
#yes 


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